Society of African Journal Editors

African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

A SURVEY OF VICTIMS OF FIVE FORMS OF STALKING AND THEIR PERCEPTIONS OF THEAVAILABLE SUPPORT AMONGST THE STUDENT POPULATION, UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER, UK.

Authors: A S DAIRO

Journal: African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues

A number of studies have highlighted that stalking victimisation is a problem amongst student populations. However, little work has considered the extent of victimisation, types of stalking and levels of reporting with UK student population. Therefore, this paper explores stalking amongst students at Leicester. Using  survey data from 477 students enrolled at the University of Leicester, the current study assesses the extent of five forms of stalking incidents amongst the sampled population, determines the nature of relationship that exists between victims of stalking and their perpetrators and evaluates the stalking victim’s attitude towards reporting their victimisation. Results from the study reveal: 147 victims, lifetime stalking prevalence 30.8% and 26.0% for cyber stalking. Female students had a higher prevalence 36% than males 23%. Victims in the survey experienced an average of 1.7 stalking incident each (stalking concentration) at the rate of 52 victims to 100 stalking incidents (stalking incidence).The most common form of stalking incidents was unwanted electronic communication 49.4% via telephone 29.1%. Most of the victims were electronically stalked for intimacy by someone they knew. There was a significant positive relationship between violent behaviours and other forms of stalking incidents. More than two third did not seek help; more than half of those that did were from family and friends and less than half of the identified victims would seek counselling help. Findings are discussed in terms of both theoretical and policy implications.